Mobile Phones + Social Media = Classroom Tools? Learning through two distractive technologies in the high school

We presented this paper at Social Media & Society 2019 in Toronto, Canada.

The objective of this study is to examine the challenges or tensions that both mobile phones and social media play when they enter the formal classroom setting. In contrast to the many studies that Borko (2004) would refer to as “existence proofs” documenting the potential of a technology or approach, this study delves directly into an authentic school context to find out what teachers and students are doing without extra guidance or incentive. In this sense, we are able to begin sketching one portrait of “typical” experiences with mobile phones and social media in the high school classroom.

Untitled design

Our slides can be viewed on slideshare.

Teens and Social Media: A Case Study of High School Students’ Informal Learning Practices and Trajectories

We presented this work-in-progress paper at Social Media & Society 2018 in Copenhagen (July 2018).

Bagdy, L. M., Dennen, V. P., Rutledge, S. A., Rowlett, J. T., and Burnick, S. (2018). Teens and Social Media: A Case Study of High School Students’ Informal Learning Practices and Trajectories. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Social Media and Society (SMSociety ’18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 241-245. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3217804.3217920

Link to paper.

 

Avoiding Drama: Student and Teacher Positioning within a School’s Social Media Ecosystem

We presented this work-in-progress paper at Social Media & Society 2018 in Copenhagen (July 2018).

Dennen, V. P., Rutledge, S. A., Bagdy, L. M., Rowlett, J. T. & Burnick, S. (2018). Avoiding drama: Student and teacher positioning within a school’s social media ecosystem. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Social Media and Society (SMSociety ’18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 271-275. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3217804.3217927

Link to paper.

Embedded Research Approach (new article in TechTrends)

We’ve just had an article accepted in TechTrends detailing the method we devised for Year 1 of our project.

Citation:  

Dennen, V.P. & Rutledge, S.A. (2018). The embedded lesson approach to social media research: Researching online phenomena in an authentic offline setting. TechTrends. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-018-0315-4

Abstract:

For American teenagers, social media participation has become a routine feature of everyday life, with ready access to their online networks via smartphones, tablets, and computers. Despite questions and concerns about its effects, relatively few educational researchers have qualitatively explored how students use social media. Complexities such as parental consent, unintended access to non-consented peers, and privacy rights may be deterrents to this research. In this paper, we describe our embedded lesson approach to studying teenagers’ social media use in a high school setting. We designed and delivered three consecutive lessons about social media to two classes. Embedded within these lessons were opportunities to collect data via surveys, focus groups, and observations, along with member checking as a form of quality assurance. This approach rapidly yielded a rich data set, while also giving students the opportunity to articulate and reflect on their social media activities and experiences.

 

SSMS Group Updates

It’s been almost a year since we’ve posted, but we’ve been busy working through our data and starting to share our findings more widely.

In April, we presented a paper at the AERA conference in New York:

Dennen, V. P., Rutledge, S. A., Bagdy, L. M., Rowlett, J. T., Burnick, S., & Joyce, S. (2018). Social  networking  sites,  teen  identity,  and  high  schools:  Unregulated  social  spaces  in  formal  learning  environments  Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY. 

Coming up in July, we’ll be presenting two papers and a poster at the Social Media & Society conference in Copenhagen:

Bagdy, L. M., Dennen, V. P., Rutledge, S. A., Rowlett, J. T., & Burnick, S. (2018). Teens and social media: A case study of high school students’ informal learning practices and trajectories. Paper to be presented at the 9th International  Conference  on  Social  Media  &  Society. doi:10.1145/3217804.3217927

Dennen, V. P., Rutledge, S. A., Bagdy, L. M., Rowlett, J. T., & Burnick, S. (2018). Avoiding  drama:  Student  and  teacher  positioning  within  a  school’s  social  media  ecosystem. Paper to be presented at the  9th International  Conference  on  Social  Media  &  Society. doi:10.1145/3217804.3217927

Rutledge, S. A., Dennen, V. P., Bagdy, L. M., Rowlett, J. T., & Burnick, S. (2018). Exploring adolescent social media use and high schools: Tensions and compatibilities. Poster to be presented at the  9th International  Conference  on  Social  Media  &  Society.

We’ll be sure to share slides, papers, and posters when the time comes!

Social Media & Society 2017

July 2017 marks our first foray into public dissemination of findings from Year 1! Our paper, titled Context Collapse and Student Social Media Networks: Where Life and High School Collide is being presented at the Social Media & Society 2017 conference in Toronto.

The abstract of our paper is:

This study examines the intersection of high school students’ in-school and out-of-school communities in a social media context. Students in two classes (10th and 12th grade) participated in a 3-day unit about social media networks and context collapse. During this unit, they diagrammed their communities and social media tool networks and discussed related issues governing how they use social media in and out of school. Findings show that high school students experience context collapse, but do not view it as a negative occurrence so much as an expected one in networked digital environments. They are adept at managing context collapse, and use a variety of means to communicate online with different groups of people. Specifically, they maintain technological lines of separation between their family and other groups, and they relegate digital interactions with their closest friends to more private spaces than the ones that social networking tools afford.

The paper is located here: http://bit.ly/SSMS_CC

Slides are located here: https://www.slideshare.net/vanessadennen/context-collapse-and-student-social-media-networks-where-life-and-high-school-collide